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  • Michael Field

Wishful Thinking Content


Would it be fair to say that the indie film world or maybe this whole industry is based upon hope? Potential? Wishful thinking? Is the major commodity that's being traded amongst storytellers the idea of what project they could possibly be working on?

I get it. This is how the business works. When we realize we want to tell stories, we naively go into it thinking: Just give me a chance and someone will see the talent.


We all know the end of that story. Even the most talented get overlook, so we persevere. We keep at it. We struggle until opportunity and luck meet. And that way works. I wanted it to work for me. But is it the most efficient way to get it done? Isn't there a better way to do this?

This is a business. We need to start acting like it. Every project you make, you're starting small business. Your product is the content. She doesn't sell seashells by the seashore in hopes to get to sell more seashells. She sells them to make money to help her sell more seashells. (Say that three times fast!)

Note: Why the hell is she selling seashells by the seashore? Wouldn't the seashore already be loaded with seashells for people to pick up on their own for free? She should go inland where seashells are scarce. Or open up an Etsy account.

We make content, we want to find the best place to sell it. Stop making content in hopes it'll get people to notice you. Make content that you can sell. Make content that you can market. I'm not saying to make content that goes against your style, but if you like to make black and white silent horror films, you have a niche audience. Find them. Promote to them. Sell to them.

We always hear: Tell the stories you want to hear. Maybe it's time we tell stories that we want to sell, not the stories we want someone to like and then maybe give us a chance to make more.

#indiefilm #writing #content #etsy #SheSellsSeaShells #filmmaking #storytelling

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